Category Archives: Parenting

Parenting

When the Kids Fight: Flames on the Side of My Face

These are my kids: Bongo, Lulabelle, and the Baby. They are talented, smart, funny (they get that from me), good-looking (they get that from their mother), and all-around awesome.

When people see them they think they’re like this all the time.

The Niños

I love my kids!

Usually, they get along exceptionally well, but now that it’s summer they’ve been spending a lot more time with each other. This means that by the time I come home from work they’ve pretty much driven each other (and their mother) crazy. That’s when the fighting starts.

I don’t know if it’s the whining or the screaming part of the fighting—no wait, it’s totally the screaming—however, when the fighting starts something terrible happens to me.

I get so angry that I lose the ability to formulate coherent sentences. I feel like Madeline Kahn in this scene from Clue.

I love my kids. Let me say it again, I love my kids! However, the fighting and screaming, have to go. My sanity depends on it.

All images are from my flickr, unless otherwise noted.

I’d Rather Sleep Like a 10 Year Old

Whoever coined he term “sleeping like a baby” obviously never had children. My baby does not like to go to sleep. Ever. And when she does finally conk out it is a sleep so light that a butterfly’s sneeze could wake her.

IMG_0248

My 10 year old, on the other hand, sleeps so soundly that I’m not even sure a nuclear blast could rouse her. She is capable of falling out of bed with her head on the floor and her feet still in bed–and not even that will wake her.

That is why I’d rather sleep like a 10 year old.

Why I Want My Son to Be a Scout

History of the Boy Scouts of America

Image via Wikipedia

Over the weekend I participated in a training for adult leaders in the Boy Scouts of America. One thing that stood out to me was an in–depth discussion we had with regards to the Scout Law.

In the past, I’d thought of the Scout Law as kind of a laundry list of positive attributes which we should aspire to emulate. But, the true intent of the law is so much greater than the simple text that makes it up.

Below is a comprehensive description of each of the foundational scouting values which comprise the law as found at the US Scouting Service Project.

A Scout is…

Trustworthy

A Scout tells the truth. He is honest, and he keeps his promises. People can depend on him.

Loyal

A Scout is true to his family, friends, Scout leaders, school, and nation.

Helpful

A Scout cares about other people. He willingly volunteers to help others without expecting payment or reward.

Friendly

A Scout is a friend to all. He is a brother to other Scouts. He offers his friendship to people of all races and nations, and respects them even if their beliefs and customs are different from his own.

Courteous

A Scout is polite to everyone regardless of age or position. He knows that using good manners makes it easier for people to get along.

Kind

A Scout knows there is strength in being gentle. He treats others as he wants to be treated. Without good reason, he does not harm or kill any living thing.

Obedient

A Scout follows the rules of his family, school, and troop. He obeys the laws of his community and country. If he thinks these rules and laws are unfair, he tries to have them changed in an orderly manner rather than disobeying them.

Cheerful

A Scout looks for the bright side of life. He cheerfully does tasks that come his way. He tries to make others happy.

Thrifty

A Scout works to pay his own way and to help others. He saves for the future. He protects and conserves natural resources. He carefully uses time and property.

Brave

A Scout can face danger although he is afraid. He has the courage to stand for what he thinks is right even if others laugh at him or threaten him.

Clean

A Scout keeps his body and mind fit and clean. He chooses the company of those who live by high standards. He helps keep his home and community clean.

Reverent

A Scout is reverent toward God. He is faithful in his religious duties. He respects the beliefs of others.

normal rockwell

Image courtesy of freeparking on flickr

That is exactly the type of young man I want my son to grow into. Heck, it’s the type of grown man I strive to be! And that’s precisely why I want my son to be a scout.

What kind of person do you want your children to become? How do you think you can help them develop those qualities? Sound off in the comments below.